Incoterms 2020 CIP: Spotlight on Carriage and Insurance Paid To

David Noah | February 19, 2020 | Incoterms
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Incoterms 2020 CIP: Spotlight on Carriage and Insurance Paid ToIncoterms 2020 rules are the latest revision of international terms of trade published by the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC). They are recognized as the authoritative text for determining how costs and risks are allocated to parties conducting international transactions.

Incoterms 2020 rules outline whether the seller or the buyer is responsible for, and must assume the cost of, specific standard tasks that are part of the international transport of goods. In addition, they identify when the risk or liability of the goods transfers from the seller to the buyer.

In this article, we’re discussing the Incoterm CIP, also known as Carriage and Insurance Paid To.

There are 11 trade terms available under the Incoterms 2020 rules that range from Ex Works (EXW), which conveys the least amount of responsibility and risk on the seller, to Delivered Duty Paid (DDP), which places the most responsibility and risk on the seller. The Incoterms 2020 Rules: Chart of Responsibilities and Transfer of Risk summarizes the seller and buyer responsibilities under each of the 11 terms.

For a summary of Incoterms 2020 and a short definition of each of the 11 terms, read The Beginner's Introduction to Incoterms.

Carriage and Insurance Paid To Responsibilities and Risk

Under the Incoterms 2020 rules, CIP means the seller is responsible for delivering goods to the first carrier or another person stipulated by the seller at a named place of shipment, at which point risk transfers to the buyer. The seller is responsible for the transportation costs and insurance associated with delivering goods at least to the named place of destination.

CIP is one of only two Incoterms 2020 rules that identify which of the parties must purchase insurance (the other being CIF—Cost, Insurance and Freight).

With the release of the Incoterms 2020 rules, the amount of insurance required under CIP has increased to at least 110% of the value of the goods as detailed in Clause A of the Institute Cargo Clauses rather than the lower level provided under Clause C, which is what was required for CIP in the 2010 rules and still is required for CIF. This is because CIP is most commonly used for manufactured goods with higher value than the commodity goods more typically shipped under CIF.

Since this is a standard export transaction, the seller or its agent is responsible for submitting the Electronic Export Information (EEI) through AESDirect on the ACE portal.

Learn more: Watch the free Incoterms 2020 webinar.

Carriage and Insurance Paid To Transportation Options

The ICC has divided the 11 Incoterms into those that can be used for any mode of transportation and those that should only be used for transport by “sea and inland waterway.” Under Incoterms 2020, CIP can be used for any mode of transportation.

Using Carriage and Insurance Paid To

With all of the C-group terms, including CPT, the seller is responsible for contracting international transportation and purchasing insurance. The named place where the transfer of responsibility occurs is always on the buyer’s side.

Learn More about Incoterms 2020 Rules

If you are regularly involved in international trade, you need to understand the risks and responsibilities as defined by Incoterms 2020 rules, not just pick the term you always use. Start by getting a copy of ICC's Incoterms® 2020 Rules book.

For a more detailed understanding of which term or terms make the most sense for your company, register for an Incoterms® 2020 Rules seminar or webinar offered by International Business Training. If you don't want to attend a half-day class, you can get the book provided at these seminars and webinars: Incoterms® 2020 for Importers and Exporters.

If history is any indication, the Incoterms 2020 rules will be around for at least a decade. Now seems like the perfect time to make sure you understand each of the terms, so you can make sure you’re speaking the same language as your international trading partner.


This article was first published in March 2017 and has been updated and revised based on the changes made with the release of the Incoterms 2020 rules.