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Filing Your Export Shipments through AES

David Noah | May 22, 2019 | Automated Export System (AES)

If your company exports goods valued at more than $2,500 to anywhere other than Canada or exports goods that require an export license, U.S. Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR) require that you file your export information electronically through the Automated Export System (AES).

The Census Bureau uses this information to calculate export statistics and shares it with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to ensure compliance with U.S. export regulations.

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Understanding U.S. Principal Party in Interest (USPPI)

Catherine J. Petersen | April 15, 2019 | Automated Export System (AES)

In the fall of 2000, the U. S. Census Bureau updated the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR) and replaced the term Exporter with the term U.S. Principal Party in Interest or USPPI.

Even though this change was made nearly two decades ago, some companies are still confused by this change especially when it comes to their responsibilities even if they are only shipping the goods to a domestic location.

In this blog post I'll try to clarify the responsibilities of a USPPI and use a series of case studies to identify the exporter and USPPI in each of the scenarios.

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How and Why to Register for AESDirect

David Noah | February 27, 2019 | Automated Export System (AES)

Most exports from the United States must have the electronic export information (EEI) filed through the Automated Export System (AES). Depending on the terms of the export, the exporter, a freight forwarder, or some other agent may do the actual filing.

Even if your company isn’t submitting the EEI filing, it’s still important for all exporters to create an account on the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) where this filing is done. In this article, we’ll identify how to register for AESDirect on ACE and why it’s a must-do for U.S. exporters.

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Exporters: Review the ACE Reports of Your AESDirect Filings

Catherine J. Petersen | February 11, 2019 | Automated Export System (AES)

Most exports from the United States require that the Electronic Export Information (EEI) be filed through AESDirect on the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) portal. Depending on the circumstances of the export—Is this a routed export transaction?—a filing must be done by the exporter (also known as the U.S. Principal Party in Interest or USPPI), the freight forwarder, or some other agent.

Even if your company isn’t doing its own EEI filing, it behooves you to set up an ACE account so you can obtain and examine the ACE reports for all your exports. I have seen the look of shock and surprise on the faces of trade compliance professionals when they review their reports and see what information has been filed using their companies’ tax ID numbers.

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Who Is the FPPI and Why Are They Important?

David Noah | February 4, 2019 | Automated Export System (AES), Export Basics

USPPI. FPPI. EEI. POA…

OMG.

All the acronyms we use in exporting can make you feel a little overwhelmed. If you’re a little unsure how the FPPI fits into this alphabet soup, you’re not alone. Here’s what you need to know about the Foreign Principal Party in Interest (FPPI) in plain English.

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USPPI vs. Exporter: What's the Difference?

David Noah | January 30, 2019 | Automated Export System (AES), Export Basics

The language of exporting can be confusing. There are several different terms that are often used interchangeably, but they have small but important differences.

The differences between the definition of an exporter versus the definition of a U.S. Principal Party in Interest (USPPI) may seem minute but are actually important to understand. While many people use these terms interchangeably, they’re not exactly the same.

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Understanding the Schedule B for Export Classification

Lisa Nemer | November 7, 2018 | Automated Export System (AES), Export Basics

U.S. export laws are complex, but there is one piece that is fairly straight-forward and easy to understand: the Schedule B. The Schedule B is the export classification system of the United States, and is administered by the Foreign Trade Division of the Census Bureau, which is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

A Schedule B code is 10 digits long, and there is a Schedule B code for every product. The codes are used by the Census Bureau to collect and publish U.S. export statistics.

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Exporting Cars: What You Need to Know

Arnesh Roy | June 18, 2018 | Automated Export System (AES), Export Basics

You just bought a car from a U.S. dealership and want to sell it to a foreign buyer in Canada. You’re vaguely aware of a rule stating that exporting used vehicles out of the U.S. requires specific documentation. But this is just something you’re putting up on Craig’s List. And you just bought the car, so of course it’s not used—right?

This is where things get tricky. When it comes to U.S. export regulations, what is considered a used vehicle is broader than you might expect.

According to Customs and Border Protection (CBP), a used vehicle is defined as “any self-propelled vehicle the equitable or legal title to which has been transferred by a manufacturer, distributor, or dealer to an ultimate purchaser.”

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5 Reasons You Need a Shipper’s Letter of Instruction for Your Exports

Catherine J. Petersen | May 21, 2018 | Automated Export System (AES), Export Forms

When it comes to preparing export paperwork, the Shipper’s Letter of Instruction (SLI) is one document that many exporters are inexplicably reluctant to prepare. They shouldn’t be.

By completing an SLI and sending it to the freight forwarder, you are establishing a best practice for your firm. You have a written record of who received the shipping documents, who to contact for questions, who to contact for proof of export, and who issued the export control documentation that supports the decision to send your products to your foreign customer.

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What the Heck Is a Routed Export Transaction?

David Noah | May 16, 2018 | Automated Export System (AES), Export Basics

A routed export transaction occurs when the foreign buyer of the goods contracts with a freight forwarder or other agent to export the merchandise from the United States.

This is in contrast to a standard export transaction in which the seller of the goods arranges the transport of the merchandise out of the country.

Why is this important? Because it impacts who is required to file the electronic export information (EEI) through the Automated Export System (AES) when required by the U.S. Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR).

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