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Filing through AESDirect: 20 Terms Exporters Need to Know

David Noah | July 6, 2020 | Automated Export System (AES)

Does your company export goods valued at more than $2,500 to anywhere other than Canada? If so, you’re probably no stranger to the U.S. Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR) that require your Electronic Export Information (EEI) be filed through AESDirect on the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) server.

The AESDirect filing process can be intimidating. (Just look at all the acronyms in my very first paragraph.) And the penalties for misfiling—or failing to file—can be tens of thousands of dollars. That's why many exporters pay a third party, typically their freight forwarder, to file on their behalf.

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5 Reasons You Need a Shipper’s Letter of Instruction for Your Exports

Catherine J. Petersen | June 29, 2020 | Automated Export System (AES), Export Forms

When it comes to preparing export paperwork, the Shipper’s Letter of Instruction (SLI) is one document that many exporters are inexplicably reluctant to prepare. They shouldn’t be.

By completing an SLI and sending it to the freight forwarder, you are establishing a best practice for your firm. You have a written record of who received the shipping documents, who to contact for questions, who to contact for proof of export, and who issued the export control documentation that supports the decision to send your products to your foreign customer.

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Who Is Responsible for Filing the Electronic Export Information (EEI)?

Arnesh Roy | May 11, 2020 | Automated Export System (AES)

As an exporter, you will no doubt become familiar with the Automated Export System (AES) if you aren’t already. This is the system that the United States uses to collect data on exports out of the country as outlined in the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR).

The U.S. Census Bureau uses this data, which they call Electronic Export Information (EEI), to compile statistics on economic indicators and the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the United States. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) uses this data to ensure that exporters are following regulations and that exports do not end up in the hands of restricted parties who may pose a threat to the national security of the United States.

All exporters should know if, how and when they are expected to file their export information through AES.

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What Is an EEI Filing?

David Noah | March 11, 2020 | Automated Export System (AES)

Are you adrift in the sea of export acronyms? Like many industries there are scores of acronyms that get bandied about like tennis balls at Wimbledon. Some of them you probably have heard of; others only come up in specific circumstances.

One of the most important of these acronyms is EEI, which stands for Electronic Export Information. You’ve probably heard it used along with another set of acronyms—AES, ACE, and SED. Let’s take a look at what it means and why it’s important.

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Standard vs. Routed Export Shipment: What's the Difference?

David Noah | March 9, 2020 | Automated Export System (AES)

I recently got a call from someone trying to gain a better understanding of the differences between standard and routed export shipments (also called routed export transactions) and how responsibilities change when dealing with routed export shipments. 

Then, I got another call, and then an email or two, and so on—so perhaps you have these questions as well. Let me explain.

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How to Determine the USPPI

David Noah | February 26, 2020 | Automated Export System (AES)

In the exporting industry, we tend to talk about our roles in general terms: I’m the exporter, you’re the importer, he’s the freight forwarder, etc. However, these terms aren’t always precise enough.

In some circumstances, it's more accurate to say "I am the U.S. Principal Party in Interest (USPPI)" instead of "I am the exporter." It's important to understand the difference in meaning between these two terms.

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What's the Difference between a Schedule B Code and an HS Number?

David Noah | January 15, 2020 | Automated Export System (AES), Export Basics

“All squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares.”

That idea really confounded me as a child learning geometry. How could one belong to another, yet the inverse not be true? As my teacher explained, the difference lies in specificity.

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How to File Your EEI through ACE and AESDirect

David Noah | September 11, 2019 | Automated Export System (AES), Export Forms

The U.S. Census Department requires exporters to submit Electronic Export Information, or EEI, on shipments to most foreign destinations if those shipments are valued at $2,500 or more per Schedule B code. Exporters must file that information through the Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) portal, which is maintained by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).

Exporters need to know how to file that information correctly. They want to make sure they are complying with regulations while doing it quickly and easily, so it doesn’t become a burden. Fortunately, you can do both.

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Filing Your Export Shipments through AES

David Noah | May 22, 2019 | Automated Export System (AES)

If your company exports goods valued at more than $2,500 to anywhere other than Canada or exports goods that require an export license, U.S. Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR) require that you file your export information electronically through the Automated Export System (AES).

The Census Bureau uses this information to calculate export statistics and shares it with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) to ensure compliance with U.S. export regulations.

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Understanding U.S. Principal Party in Interest (USPPI)

Catherine J. Petersen | April 15, 2019 | Automated Export System (AES)

In the fall of 2000, the U. S. Census Bureau updated the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR) and replaced the term Exporter with the term U.S. Principal Party in Interest or USPPI.

Even though this change was made nearly two decades ago, some companies are still confused by this change especially when it comes to their responsibilities even if they are only shipping the goods to a domestic location.

In this blog post I'll try to clarify the responsibilities of a USPPI and use a series of case studies to identify the exporter and USPPI in each of the scenarios.

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