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Arnesh Roy

Arnesh Roy is an Inside Sales Representative at Shipping Solutions. She helps customers with their questions and concerns regarding the export process and helps connect them to the products they need to fulfill their job responsibilities related to exporting. Arnesh joined Shipping Solutions after graduating from Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota, with a B.A. in psychology. She enjoys talking to new people and is always happy to help.

Articles Written By Arnesh Roy

BIS Eliminates License Exception CIV

Arnesh Roy | June 15, 2020 | Export Compliance

The U.S. Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has announced that license exception CIV (Civil End-Users) has been eliminated effective June 29, 2020. BIS also announced a related expansion of military end-use and end-user controls.

An export license exception allows you to export certain items that may be controlled by the U.S. Export Administration Regulations (EAR) without first obtaining an export license from the Commerce Department. For a more detailed explanation of export license exceptions, read my article: A Beginner's Guide to Export License Exceptions.

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Who Is Responsible for Filing the Electronic Export Information (EEI)?

Arnesh Roy | May 11, 2020 | Automated Export System (AES)

As an exporter, you will no doubt become familiar with the Automated Export System (AES) if you aren’t already. This is the system that the United States uses to collect data on exports out of the country as outlined in the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR).

The U.S. Census Bureau uses this data, which they call Electronic Export Information (EEI), to compile statistics on economic indicators and the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the United States. U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) uses this data to ensure that exporters are following regulations and that exports do not end up in the hands of restricted parties who may pose a threat to the national security of the United States.

All exporters should know if, how and when they are expected to file their export information through AES.

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Export Regulations: The U.S. Agencies We Often Overlook

Arnesh Roy | April 20, 2020 | Export Compliance

Those of us who’ve worked in exporting for a while are aware that government regulations on exports are primarily administered by either the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) via the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) or the State Department’s Directorate of Defense Trade Control (DDTC) via the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR).

BIS governs commercial and dual-use items, while DDTC governs military items. Successful, compliant organizations need to understand and abide by those regulations.

In addition, the U.S. Census Bureau, also part of the Commerce Department, administers the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR), which require the reporting of electronic export information through the Automated Export System (AES). (You can learn more about the three primary sets of export regulations by reading: The Three R’s of Export Compliance: FTR, EAR and ITAR.)

That was my take on things. For a while. But I talk to more and more people whose exports (and imports) are controlled by other U.S. agencies.

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Foreign Trade Zones: Advantages for Importers and Exporters

Arnesh Roy | January 13, 2020 | Import Basics, Export Basics

If you import or export, you may be familiar with the terms foreign trade zone and free trade zone, both of which are frequently abbreviated as FTZ. These terms are often used interchangeably to refer to a class of government-run duty-free zones, but they actually mean slightly different things.

Free trade zone is a more general, universal term. Customs authorities representing governments across the globe have established free trade zones. Free trade zones are areas in which commodities can be manufactured, modified or stored under specific customs regulations and generally not subject to customs duties.

According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), foreign trade zones are the United States’ version of free trade zones. FTZs are designated areas within the United States that are legally located outside of the customs territory of the United States, meaning that goods that reside within an established FTZ haven’t yet cleared customs.

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Export Compliance: The Importance of Knowing End Use and End Users

Arnesh Roy | December 9, 2019 | Export Compliance, Export Basics

You’ve just found a buyer in a foreign country and you’re preparing to close the sale—great! But there’s one thing you should keep in mind that is easy to overlook: the end use and end users.

You will need to determine the end-use (how will the product ultimately be used) and the end-user (who will ultimately use the product). To ensure that you are compliant with the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) and the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) of the United States, you must be sure that you are not shipping goods to a prohibited end-user or for a prohibited end-use.

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EAR Explained: Understanding Export License Acronyms

Arnesh Roy | November 11, 2019 | Export Compliance

The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), which is part of the U.S. Commerce Department, is responsible for implementing and enforcing the law that "regulates the export, reexport and certain transfers of most commercial items as well as some less-sensitive military items" that are subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR).

While there are many other agencies in other departments that regulate certain items, BIS has jurisdiction over most items—commodities, software and technology—created for commercial use.

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Export Administration Regulations: Understanding Export License Exceptions

Arnesh Roy | October 7, 2019 | Export Compliance

There are many reasons the U.S. government has decided some goods should require a second look before they can be exported to certain countries.

In my previous article I explained what these various reasons for control are as they appear in the Commerce Department’s Export Administration Regulations (EAR). And I explained why exporters would need to apply for an export license from the U.S. government based on the particular Reason for Control and the destination country.

Even if one or more reasons might apply to a product going to a specific country, the EAR also provides exceptions to the export license requirement.

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Export Administration Regulations: Understanding Reasons for Control

Arnesh Roy | August 5, 2019 | Export Compliance

In a previous article I explained the export license determination process for exports of dual-use items controlled by the U.S. Department of Commerce under the Export Administration Regulations (EAR).

We walked through how exporters must first find the correct Export Control Classification Numbers (ECCNs) of their products and then determine if an export license is required based on what reasons for control apply to the export and whether or not any license exceptions are available.

Today’s article gives a summary of each EAR reason for control.

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Using the Commerce Country Chart to Determine If You Need an Export License

Arnesh Roy | May 13, 2019 | Export Compliance

In a previous blog post, I discussed what I had learned by attending a seminar cosponsored by the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) and the Minnesota Trade Office. I described how to find an item’s Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) on the Commerce Control List (CCL).

In today’s blog post, I will describe the next step in the process: How to use the Commerce Country Chart to determine if an export license is required based on the reasons for control.

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Export License Determination: Understanding Reasons for Control and License Exceptions

Arnesh Roy | October 17, 2018 | Export Compliance

Does my product require an export license? That's a question you should ask before every export.

In order to find the answer, you first need to answer two preliminary questions:

  • What is the Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) of the product?
  • What is the destination country?

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